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Global Sea Ice Extent

September 17th Data:

Arctic Sea Ice: 1.2 Million km

Antarctic Sea Ice: 1.5 million km

Net Global Sea Ice Deviation: 0.3 million km

LOUISIANA ECOLOGICAL HARM CALLED UNPRECEDENTED

Quote From Source:

The environmental damage from hurricanes Katrina and Rita is unparalleled in its scope and variety, scientists say, with massive oil spills blanketing marshes, sediment smothering vast fishing grounds, and millions of gallons of raw sewage scattered in New Orleans and along the 400-mile Louisiana coast.

The catastrophe extends from the heart of the Big Easy, where streets, sidewalks, and floors are coated with a thick mud mixed with human waste, to the fringe of protective marshland, sugarcane fields, and citrus groves along the Gulf Coast that are beginning to die from the sea's salty surge. Thousands of acres seem to have been swallowed forever by the ocean.
Source: ENN

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1 comment to LOUISIANA ECOLOGICAL HARM CALLED UNPRECEDENTED

  • (Washington, D.C.-October 6, 2005) EPA, in coordination with Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality, collected water and sediment samples from multiple locations across the New Orleans metropolitan area between September 26-30, 2005.

    Quote From Source:

    Flood Water Data 9/26/05

    Flood water samples for September 26, 2005 indicated that manganese was detected at concentrations that exceeded ATSDR/CDC health guidance values based on ingestion of the water. EPA and ATSDR/CDC do not feel that manganese levels pose a human health threat as ingestion of flood water should not be occurring unless there is inadvertent ingestion (e.g., from splashing). EPA and ATSDR/CDC recommend avoiding all contact with flood water, where possible, and washing with soap and water should contact with flood water occur. Bacterial contamination consistent with the presence of sewage was also detected. Personal protective equipment, such as gloves and safety glasses, should be worn by emergency responders. See:
    http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/hurricanes/index.asp for specific guidance for workers and returning residents.

    Sediment Data for 9/26/05

    Tests results for sediment samples taken 9/26/05 indicate the continued presence of petroleum products. Lead concentrations were greater than ATSDR/CDC health guidance values for three samples assuming the sediment was ingested. EPA and ATSDR/CDC conclude that exposures at these levels to emergency responders are not expected to cause adverse health effects as long as the proper protective equipment is worn such as gloves and safety glasses. Volatile, and semivolatile organic compounds, including polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), as well as pesticides and heavy metals including antimony, arsenic, and chromium, were found, but at levels below what ATSDR/CDC considers to be immediately hazardous to human health. Bacterial contamination as expected from sewage contamination was also detected. EPA and ATSDR/CDC recommend avoiding all contact with sediment deposited by the flood water, where possible, due to potential concerns associated with long-term skin contact. See:
    http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/hurricanes/index.asp for specific guidance for workers and returning residents.

    Sediment Data for 9/27/05

    Sediment samples for September 27, 2005 indicate the continued presence of petroleum products. Arsenic was detected at levels exceeding ATSDR/CDC health guidance values based on ingesting the sediment. EPA and ATSDR/CDC conclude that exposures at these levels to emergency responders are not expected to cause adverse health effects as long as the proper protective equipment is worn such as gloves and safety glasses. Volatile, and semivolatile organic compounds, including polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), as well as pesticides and heavy metals including hexavalent and trivalent chromium, were found, but at levels below what ATSDR/CDC considers to be immediately hazardous to human health. Bacterial contamination as expected from sewage was also indicated. EPA and ATSDR/CDC recommend avoiding all contact with sediment deposited by the flood water, where possible, due to potential concerns associated with long-term skin contact. See:
    http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/hurricanes/index.asp for advice for workers and returning residents.

    Sediment Data 9/30/05

    Sediment samples for September 30, 2005 indicate the continued presence of petroleum products. Arsenic and lead were detected at levels exceeding ATSDR/CDC health guidance values based on ingestion. EPA and ATSDR/CDC conclude that exposures at these levels to emergency responders are not expected to cause adverse health effects as long as the proper protective equipment is worn such as gloves and safety glasses. Volatile, and semivolatile organic compounds, including polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), as well as pesticides and heavy metals including aluminum, were found, but at levels below what ATSDR/CDC considers to be immediately hazardous to human health.
    Bacterial contamination consistent with the presence of sewage was also detected. EPA and ATSDR/CDC recommend avoiding all contact with sediment deposited by the flood water, where possible, due to potential concerns associated with long-term skin contact. See:
    http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/hurricanes/index.asp for advice for workers and returning residents.

    Source: From EPA News Brief Dated Tursday Oct 7th 2005

    “no health threat cough-bollox-cough apparently”

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